Animal Facts

209 facts tagged with Animal Facts

In Japan, there are more pets than there are children.
After octopuses breed, they develop dementia. They then live the rest of their lives in this confused, seemingly lost state, with apparently no knowledge of previous events.
Sloths can swim three times faster than they can move on land. They can also hold their breath for up to 40 minutes.
After being in captivity for 23 years, the orca from Free Willy, Keiko, was set free in 2002. Weeks later, he appeared at a Norwegian fjord apparently seeking human contact and even gave rides to children on his back.
About 60 million years ago, there was a species of turtle that was so large and had such powerful jaws that it could have devoured a crocodile.
A hippo sleeping underwater automatically rises to the surface every ~4 minutes and breathes without waking.
In 1955, the citizens of São Paulo were so upset with their government that they elected a rhinoceros named Cacareco (meaning rubbish) to the city council in protest, with over 100,000 votes.
Dogs sometimes fake being sick to get attention.
When Koko, the gorilla famous for knowing sign language, was asked where gorillas go after death, she responded by signing “Comfortable hole, bye.”
In 1918, a homing pigeon saved over 190 American soldiers by delivering a message to nearby support despite having been shot through the breast, blinded in one eye, covered in blood, and with a leg hanging on by just a tendon.
It has been estimated that a bite from a grizzly bear can crush a bowling ball.
The Tree Lobster, once thought to be extinct, is an insect that can grow to the size of a human hand, and it can only be found on a small island of rock that is Ball's Pyramid, Australia.
When Washoe, the first chimp to use sign language, was told that her caretaker's baby had died, she signed "CRY."
In the movie 'The Wizard Of Oz', Toto the dog's salary was $125 a week, while Judy Garland’s was $500 a week.
Whales and dolphins can't taste anything other than salt.
In 2011, a male tiger in India adopted a litter of orphaned cubs, taking on the role of ‘mother’. Wildlife officials say such behavior had never been observed before.
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